South American Hardwoods



Morado is a tree found in Brazil and Bolivia. Its wood is often used for making fingerboards for electric basses and guitars. It has a similar feel and similar tonal attributes to rosewood, but is harder and has a slightly lighter colour. The wood may also be used for flooring, fancy furniture, and handgun grips. It is also known by the names palo santos, caviuna, Brazilian ironwood, and Bolivian rosewood, though it is not actually rosewood.

In guitar making, Morado is not only used for fingerboards or bridges but also can be used for the back and sides of the acoustic guitar. Although similar in many ways to rosewood, Morado has slightly different tonal qualities, with coloration from coffee brown to yellow brown and purple.



Tarara wood is a colorful exotic located in the forests of Brazil and Bolivia. Its heartwood color can be bright yellow to orange with long distinctive streaks of purple, red, and black. Tarara is durable and hard, but also rated as easy to work with, which is why, combined with its inherent attractiveness, it is often a choice for furniture makers. It's grain is irregular and interlocked, and has a lustrous surface with a medium and uniform texture.



Cumaru, commonly called Brazilian Chestnut, is a tough and dense wood imported from Brazil that has an irregular, somewhat interlocked grain and wavy, course texture. Because of its density, it is very resistant to termites and decay. Cumaru's heartwood is a medium brown with distinctive tan shades that compliment one another in with tonal warmth to create a relaxing feeling that's great to come home to.



Sirari is an exquisite example of the beautiful hardwoods hailing from South America. Starting out as soft pink tinged with russet during its youth, Sirari reddens slightly with age, creating rich and contrasting tones. Sirari is also one of the most durable hardwoods on the market with a Janka rating of 3,280. With its combination of vibrant and soothing colors, Sirari is particularly beautiful when accompanied by black furniture.



Tigerwood is a highly distinctive exotic wood with vibrant reddish-brown tones and prominent black striping that varies in thickness from fine strokes to thick contours. Its interlocked grain is also wavy and irregular, complimenting the wood’s dynamic appearance. Tigerwood is ranked among the more durable hardwoods with a Janka hardness rating of 1850, making Tigerwood a visually striking floor that lasts.



Garapa has a golden to yellowish brown color, which darkens with age. The wood is fairly chatoyant, and appears to shift from dark to light coloring in different lighting angles.

Garapa has a medium texture and small open pores. The grain is usually straight, but can also be interlocked.

Garapa is fairly easy to work, considering it’s density. It glues and finishes well, and is about average for dimensional stability.



Heartwood can vary in color from a reddish brown, to a more yellowish olive brown, to a dark blackish brown; sometimes with contrasting darker brown/black stripes.

Ipe is a wood of extremes: extremely dense and durable, as well as extremely difficult to work. Its incredible hardness and strength make it well suited for flooring applications, though it is referred to as “Brazilian Walnut” among flooring dealers

Ipe is among the most durable lumbers on earth, with exceptional resistance to decay, rot, and insect attack.

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